Dino and Stacy

Most popular ways to waste time at work
Most popular ways to waste time at work

You may claim to have a 9 to 5 job, but it remains to be seen how much time is actually spent working.  Here’s some of the most popular time wasters at work.

SOCIALIZING. 14% say this their number one time waster. Ha! That’s practically our whole show.

SOCIAL NETWORKING. 77% of people with FACEBOOK check it at work. I’m not on it. I don’t even like returning emails. I can’t imagine.

JOB HUNTING. 46% of people currently searching for a job are doing it during their current working hours.

COMMUNICATION. The average person says they waste 74 minutes a day trying to contact people and wait for responses. Ha! No, thank you. I only contact if absolutely necessary and seldom wait around for responses. Get back to me when you can. In the meantime, I’ll be socializing.

DAYDREAMING. Only 4% say this is their top distraction. That’s number one in my book. I’m constantly thinking, daydreaming, scheming, wondering, planning, plotting, sketching, outlining and musing about the next thing. In fact – halfway through this blog, I started thinking about tomorrow’s entry. Have a wasteful day. Just look busy while you’re doing it.

 

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