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Vanilla Ice goes ‘Amish’ for new TV show

Vanilla Ice goes ‘Amish’ for new TV show

FROM 'ICE ICE BABY' TO AMISH: Vanilla Ice (seen here circa 1991) is going Amish for his latest reality TV gig. Photo: Associated Press

From raising eyebrows to raising barns, Vanilla Ice, the ’90s rapper behind the hit “Ice, Ice Baby” will go Amish for his new show.

Vanilla Ice, real name Robert Van Winkle, stars in his latest reality TV project, “Vanilla Ice Goes Amish.

Winkle, already an accomplished real estate investor and remodeling expert, will hone his home improvement skills with a variety of projects for what DIY Network calls “one of America’s largest Amish settlements.”

Along the way viewers are promised a look into the Amish community, where its members teach the Ice man about traditions, family, and yes, a good old-fashioned barn raising.

“Vanilla Ice Goes Amish” premieres Saturday, Oct. 12 at 10 p.m. on the DIY Network.

 

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