Educators, law enforcement get “active shooter” training

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Educators across Ohio began training in Columbus Thursday for possible school shooting situations.

Officials from the Ohio Peace Officer Training Academy, attorney general’s office and Ohio Department of Education offered training on identifying potential shooters and responding to shooting incidents.

“The fact that we are all here because of this, it is a sad day for me. You entered this field to help kids and I think this is just another phase of education,” Green Schools superintendent Michael Nutter said.

Nutter was one of about 200 educators and 60 law enforcement officers who took the first of ten school security courses yesterday in Columbus.

Two training sessions were scheduled at the Education Service Center of Central Ohio to teach educators how to protect students if an active shooter is in their school or classroom.

The session also tells school officials how they can identify a troubled student before a crime occurs, according to a release from the office of Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine.

DeWine says the training is also designed to help educators and law enforcement work together to formulate a coordinated response plan.

The courses do not include firearm training.

Preparations for the course began after last year’s school shooting in Chardon (above) but DeWine says demand for the training increased significantly after December’s shootings in Newtown, Conn.

Eight additional regional courses are scheduled in Cleveland, Cincinnati, Toledo and the Athens area.

Educators can register at the Ohio Dept. of Education’s website; law enforcement officials can sign up through the Attorney General’s office.

Weather Watch Sponsored By

Featured Events

  • No events
  • News

    in Entertainment

    Today in entertainment history: Oct. 9


    A look back at the entertainment headlines that went down in history.

    in Entertainment

    ‘Pan’ taps origins of Peter Pan’s 100-year pop culture adventure


    In the century since Scottish author J.M. Barrie created Peter Pan for a stage play then a book, the Neverland universe has inspired movies, books, TV shows, plays, video games and even a pop psychology syndrome describing emotionally immature men.

    in Lifestyle

    ‘Like’ it or not, changes are coming to Facebook


    The social network is launching a pilot test of "Reactions," which will allow users to express a range of emotions including love, happiness, anger, and sadness.